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Fjällräven Classic Sweden Day 4: Alesjaure-Kieron

And so it begins, Day 4 of the trek.

After a late night and a long hike the day before, we woke up at about 6.30am again, and left past 9am this time due to the inconvenience of the lack of a stream nearby and having to walk to the station for the water tank.

The trail follows along a lake, but the lake is NOT drinkable. It's considered a stale water body since the water collects in the lake, even though you'll see that the water is moving due to the wind. The trail from Alesjaure to Kieron has a dry portion in the second half, so you'll need to fill your bottle wherever possible. You can use the map given to look out for when the streams end.

One of the bigger streams after the Alesjaure station where you can refill your bottle. You also have to cross this stream.

The trail is mostly walking through shrubs on a wooden platform and the lake would be on your right for most of the trail. We knew that we only had 18km to cover that day, so we took it easy. After about halfway, we stopped for lunch at some rocks overlooking the lake. The view was spectacular, also because the sun was out at that time.


Where we stopped for lunch

We met our German friends while having lunch!

After the shrubs ended, the trail opened up to fields where reindeers could roam free (but we didn't see any, probably because there were too many people on the trail and it's not winter). We took a short break at 12km, which was the start of many problems later in the day. It started to drizzle after that short break and the drizzle became heavier. We were caught in that rain and by the time we got to Kieron, which comprised of a very steep down slope with wet mud due to the rain, we were completely soaked.

The steep descent with mud

The Kieron checkpoint is right after a huge river crossing with a bridge, which is the only place where you can refill water in the surrounding area. I highly suggest you refill your bottles here before heading to the checkpoint. It'll save you quite a bit of walking later on.

At Kieron, the sun came back out and there were pancakes served! We had 2 rounds of pancakes (we were lucky, because they were actually controlling the pancake servings but we went when the volunteers changed shifts).


As a result of eating our 2 rounds of pancakes, we did not set up our tent when the sun was out. The weather changed to a sudden torrential downpour and we just stood there for a good half hour to an hour at least, shivering in the cold rain. We used our umbrellas and drank hot tea, which helped a bit but it was probably one of the most horrible experiences in my life.

When the rain lightened up slightly, we hurried and pitched our tent, but by that time we were all wet and dirty and our clothes were all soaked through because we learnt that our jackets were not waterproof enough. Neither of our pants is waterproof, so they were soaked as well. Our socks and the inside of our boots got soaked since the water from our pants dripped in and collected there. The worst part was that we placed our bags on some rocks, which were wet from the rain. Since our bags had other attachments on them, our rain covers did not stretch to the bottom. Hence, the water seeped in from the bottom of our bags. Though they were G-1000, the rain was simply too heavy. This resulted in our sleeping bags getting wet since they were at the bottom. A ton of other things were wet too, but they were thankfully in ziplock bags. We didn't eat dinner that night (at least we had 6 pancakes each) but just wiped down and dried ourselves and slept at 8pm. Since we didn't have our sleeping bags, we were way too cold and woke up every 1.5 hours or so, and even had to light the gas stove in our tent to warm up the place.

I think this night was rather memorable and we definitely learnt that we need better waterproof clothing, as well as to set up the tent whenever the sun is out!

Total distance covered on Day 4: 18.15km

Read more about the Fjällräven Classic Sweden:
General Guide
Check in
Day 1
Day 2
Day 3
Day 5

Fjällräven Classic Sweden Day 3: Salka-Tjaktja-Alesjaure

Day 3 of the trek!

So far, we've been feeling great in general and getting into the rhythm of things - like how long we need to set up the tent and how long we need to prepare in the morning before setting off, as well as how far we should go before resting and when to eat.

We woke up a bit later on day 3 at 6.30am, since we had a later night (it was 10pm by the time we were done with the sauna and washing up). Therefore, we left at 8.50am. We knew that we were going to be conquering the highest point of the trek, so we ate the "light meal" for breakfast that ironically has the highest number of calories (700kcal, compared to 400/500 for the others).

From day 3 onwards, we tried a new method of faster walking and stopping more often (every 3km) for mini 5-10 min breaks. That allowed us to rest our shoulders more and also stop for more photos, as well as to admire the scenery. I mean, that's what we came here for right?



A close up of the path to the highest point



We actually climbed the Tjaktja pass rather quickly and we found that to be one of the best parts of the trek because the ground was smoother and less rocky. Since we normally run, our legs had enough power to conquer the steep elevation easily.

The descent was EXTREMELY rocky, which was more annoying than the uphill push in my opinion. There were multiple occasions when we thought we were going to twist our ankles, but thank God we didn't.

These were the type of rocks on the descent. They didn't build wooden planks for most of it.

The Tjaktja checkpoint is 4km from the pass, and for us it was a good point to stop for lunch because there's this nice, big stream near the checkpoint. Many people stopped there for awhile just to admire the scenery as well, and it's a great time to meet new friends! I think we stopped there for a good hour - removed our boots to let our socks dry in the warm sun, and to just air our feet. It was a good break.

They gave these healthy oat cookies at the Tjaktja checkpoint! 

After Tjaktja, the terrain became flatter - more sand and small buried rocks. There were also quite a number of river crossings that you need to take note of because some were rather fast flowing.

I think this is one of my favourite photos on the trek! The scenery was amazing.

We pushed all the way to the Alesjaure checkpoint and reached at 7pm. We headed to the Alesjaure station with the sauna, which is about 2km from the checkpoint. Since we were rather late, we had some difficulty finding a spot to pitch our tent. After we finally found one, we headed for the sauna. Something to note about the Alesjaure checkpoint is that there are a lack of good streams nearby. We had to take our water from a huge tank, which wasn't as fresh. On hindsight, I would have skipped out on the sauna and camped before the checkpoint or slightly after the Alesjaure station instead because there were much nicer spots with streams nearby.

Total distance covered on day 3: 26.67km

Read more about the Fjällräven Classic Sweden:
General Guide
Check in
Day 1
Day 2
Day 4
Day 5

Fjällräven Classic Sweden Day 2: Kebnekaise-Singi-Salka

So, it’s Day 2 of the trek! We woke up at 5am and I had a surprisingly good sleep, even though I still woke up multiple times due to it being slightly uncomfortable and not being used to sleeping in a tent etc. But, I was well-rested and ready to start the day! You can read about day 1 here.

It took us quite awhile to get ready to leave because we were still finding the routine of washing up, keeping our stuff and folding back the tent. It takes A LOT longer to keep the tent than set it up :/ We managed to start hiking at 7.50am after cooking breakfast (which was chocolate muesli! Read about the Real Turmat freeze dried food selections here). The terrain opens up to something more like a valley from Kebnekaise to Singi.


You’ll be walking next to a river, so there is no lack of fresh water.


You’ll also start crossing plenty of big rocks, so watch your step. The trekking pole really came in handy here.



Weather was windy and a little wet whenever a cloud passes by, so we kept our jackets and rain covers on. We generally tried to push a bit more in the morning, then take short breaks every hour or so once we started to feel a bit more fatigue. We reached Singi at 1130h, it was about 10.4km from the point we started. They give a reindeer wrap with mash potatoes and lingonberry sauce! The wrap was a bit big but it was extremely welcomed since I hadn’t eaten anything after breakfast.


It was a relatively short break because we left right after eating. We continued on for quite awhile and stopped at Kuoperjakka Sougan (it’s a rest stop) for lunch because it had a nice stream nearby and it was about 1430h. After that, it was about 7-9km more to Salka, so we decided to push on so that we could hit the Sauna that night!

We managed to reach Salka checkpoint and set up our tent near the Salka station with the sauna, which is 2km from the checkpoint.

Salka station

Sauna timings

I would highly recommend the sauna because I felt really warm and refreshed after and the one at Salka has hot water for you to bathe in! I went for the mixed gender timing so I wore a bikini but there are single gender ones as well. Some people aren’t comfortable with the nakedness of the whole experience but I personally am because I’ve been to many Japanese onsens, so it’s really up to you!

I tend to get tired at around 1-2pm because I would eat an early lunch snack and then a late proper lunch, so the in between periods would be difficult for me because I would start to get hungry and run out of energy at around 1pm. Also, the terrain is just generally rocky all the way, so that doesn’t quite help the feet. Again, I’m super thankful I got sturdy boots!

Total distance covered on Day 2: 23.79km

Read more about the Fjällräven Classic Sweden:
General Guide
Check in
Day 1
Day 3
Day 4
Day 5